10 ways to show love to your first chapter

Typewriter-Chapter-OneThe beginning of any novel is in many ways the most important part of the book. It’s during those first few paragraphs or pages that the reader decides if they are going to commit to your characters and their story or not. Often when I go to a bookstore I’ll browse the shelves,  read  the first few pages then decide if I’m ready to comment or not. Continue reading

Showing vs Telling – the battle rages on!

When I first started writing I would have my work critiqued and the most common comment was “show don’t tell”. I would put “He was disappointed.” (telling) rather than “His eyes dropped to the floor and he sighed as his shoulder sagged.” (showing) Showing lets the reader experience what your character is doing/feeling with them as though they are experiencing it too and it makes them more engaging and the reader feel a stronger Continue reading

Writing Sexual Tension

Tension is not only necessary to move your story along, but it’s also important for making your characters more relatable to your readers. Sexual tension or passion unsatisfied can be a great way to achieve this between characters he pace is slow or fast depending on your story. The main thrust of tension is caused through something keeping your characters together but also keeping them apart. Though in some genre Continue reading

How To Write A Book In 6 Months

Try this!

Casey Griffin

Photo by Alba Garriga Photo by Alba Garriga

Six months? Impossible, right? No. Nothing’s impossible if you’re willing to work for it. So ask yourself: how bad do you want it?

If you’ve noticed I’ve been MIA recently, it’s because I’m currently writing a novel in six months, and that’s on top of a full-time job that keeps me away from home for ten days at a time.

Even with your job, and your family, and your desire to maintain your sanity, you can do it too. Here’s how:

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Storybuilder Inc. — Step One: A Premise

So helpful!

Worlds of the Imagination

Welcome to Storybuilder Inc.

I approach is like a craftsman. Developing procedures and watching a story develop as I follow them is part of the fun. I’m a planner, but I make things up as I go, so the plan helps keep me on track, and gives me a good framework for when making things up requires a clean-up crew.

Today, with Step One, I will talk about the first step I take when I build a story: developing a solid premise.

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“What’s your story about?”

This question often makes writers stutter, especially when a prospective editor or agent is asking them, live time, at a conference. Now is your chance! And what do you say? “Oh, you know, it’s about lots of things…”

Stop. What is your book about? It amazed me, when I wrote failed manuscript #1 and failed manuscript #2, how, despite all the writing and…

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